Propionate ointment

Because fluocinonide ointment is a topical steroid, it can be readily absorbed through the skin. Unsupervised use of steroids can result in negative side effects, including Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis suppression, so it is important to use fluocinonide ointment only as directed by your physician and only for the prescribed length of time. People with diabetes, women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant, and nursing mothers should consult with their physician prior to using fluocinonide ointment.

Betamethasone dipropionate was patented by Merck in 1987 as an augmented cream/lotion, Diprolene in the ., and Disprosone in Europe. [7] These patents expired in 2003 and 2007 respectively leading to generic production of betamethasone dipropionate. During this time other topical corticosteroids such as triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate also became available as generic creams. Merck filed for "pediatric exclusivity" in 2001 launching a clinical trial to prove betamethasone dipropionate's safety and efficacy for use in pediatrics. [8]

Injectable steroids are injected into muscle tissue, not into the veins. They are slowly released from the muscles into the rest of the body, and may be detectable for months after last use. Injectable steroids can be oil-based or water-based. Injectable anabolic steroids which are oil-based have longer half-life than water-based steroids. Both steroid types have much longer half-lives than oral anabolic steroids. And this is proving to be a drawback for injectables as they have high probability of being detected in drug screening since their clearance times tend to be longer than orals. Athletes resolve this problem by using injectable testosterone early in the cycle then switch to orals when approaching the end of the cycle and drug testing is imminent.

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take clobetasol cream, gel, and ointment or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to clobetasol cream, gel, and ointment. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Propionate ointment

propionate ointment

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take clobetasol cream, gel, and ointment or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to clobetasol cream, gel, and ointment. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

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