Halobetasol propionate cream what is it used for

Fluticasone propionate is a highly selective agonist at the glucocorticoid receptor with negligible activity at androgen , estrogen , or mineralocorticoid receptors , thereby producing anti-inflammatory and vasoconstriction effects. It has been shown to have a wide range of inhibitory effects on multiple cell types (. mast cell , eosinophil , neutrophil , macrophages , and lymphocytes ) and mediators (. histamine , eicosanoids , leukotrienes , and cytokines ) involved in inflammation . Fluticasone propionate is stated to exert a topical effect on the lungs without significant systemic effects at usual doses, due to its low systemic bioavailability .

Like other topical corticosteroids, halobetasol propionate has anti-inflammatory, antipruritic and vasoconstrictive actions. The mechanism of the anti- inflammatory activity of the topical corticosteroids, in general, is unclear However, corticosteroids are thought to act by the induction of phospholipase A 2 inhibitory proteins , collectively called lipocorins It is postulated that these proteins control the biosynthesis of potent mediators of inflammation such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes by inhibiting the release of their common precursor arachidonic acid Arachidonic acid is released from membrane phospholipids by phospholipase A 2 .

The most common side effect of topical corticosteroid use is skin atrophy. All topical steroids can induce atrophy, but higher potency steroids, occlusion, thinner skin, and older patient age increase the risk. The face, the backs of the hands, and intertriginous areas are particularly susceptible. Resolution often occurs after discontinuing use of these agents, but it may take months. Concurrent use of topical tretinoin (Retin-A) % may reduce the incidence of atrophy from chronic steroid applications. 30 Other side effects from topical steroids include permanent dermal atrophy, telangiectasia, and striae.

In general, preferred compositions of the present invention contain up to about 5% by weight of a corticosteriod, up to about 60% by weight drying agent, one or more optional ingredients (for example, one or more anti-itch agents; anti-foaming agents; buffers, neutralizing agents, and agents to adjust pH; coloring agents and decoloring agents; emollients; emulsifying agents, emulsion stabilizers and viscosity builders; humectants; odorants; preservatives, antioxidants, and chemical stabilizers; solvents; and thickening, stiffening, and suspending agents), and a balance of water or solvent.

Betamethasone dipropionate was patented by Merck in 1987 as an augmented cream/lotion, Diprolene in the ., and Disprosone in Europe. [7] These patents expired in 2003 and 2007 respectively leading to generic production of betamethasone dipropionate. During this time other topical corticosteroids such as triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate also became available as generic creams. Merck filed for "pediatric exclusivity" in 2001 launching a clinical trial to prove betamethasone dipropionate's safety and efficacy for use in pediatrics. [8]

Halobetasol propionate cream what is it used for

halobetasol propionate cream what is it used for

In general, preferred compositions of the present invention contain up to about 5% by weight of a corticosteriod, up to about 60% by weight drying agent, one or more optional ingredients (for example, one or more anti-itch agents; anti-foaming agents; buffers, neutralizing agents, and agents to adjust pH; coloring agents and decoloring agents; emollients; emulsifying agents, emulsion stabilizers and viscosity builders; humectants; odorants; preservatives, antioxidants, and chemical stabilizers; solvents; and thickening, stiffening, and suspending agents), and a balance of water or solvent.

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